Moore Foundation MMI (new)


CLOSELY INTERACTING MICROBES AS HOTSPOTS OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL ACTIVITY



The grant to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography supports investigating how closely coupled marine microorganisms interact physically and exchange nutrient molecules. By combining new microscopy tools with molecular and isotope techniques, this project aims to advance understanding of the mechanisms that drive biogeochemical cycles in the surface ocean.


 Atomic Force Microscope image of Synechoccocus cell associated with a heterotrophic marine bacterium  
 
Hypotheses:

Our overarching hypothesis is that the abundant cyanobacteria-bacteria associations display a range of fundamental adaptive strategies and underlying mechanisms and critically influence the oceanic biogeochemical dynamics and global climate


  1. *Bacteria-cyanobacteria associations are phylogenetically diverse


  1. * Bacteria-cyanobacteria associations involve nutrient exchange between partners


  1. *Bacteria-cyanobacteria associations involve structurally & biochemically specific interactions 



Past Project Data

Bacteria-cyanobacteria associations are phylogenetically diverse
Discovery of antagonistic Synechococcus-heterotrophic bacteria interactions
Bacteria-cyanobacteria associations involve nutrients exchange between the partners
Individual cell growth rates using "click chemistry"
Microbe-microbe interactions involving vitamin B1 exchange
Atomic force microscopy of bacterial surface membranes
Marine microbes rapidly turnover a high concentration of coral-spawn derived organic matter