Marine microbes rapidly turnover a high concentration of coral-spawn derived organic matter


Each year in the Caribbean, coral species of the genus Orbicella engage in well-predicted mass spawning reproductive events in which the organisms broadcast gametes into the water column. This study investigates the microbial response to the pulse of coral-spawn derived organic matter by taking advantage of this well-predicted influx of nascent carbon potentially available to heterotrophic bacteria. We collected seawater directly after an O. franksi mass-spawning event while the gametes in the water column were highly abundant. The experiments were conducted as 60-hour microcosms in order to evaluate the breakdown of particulate organic matter, with pre-spawn and post-spawn seawater microcosms used as controls. See below slides for more information.

A manuscript containing all results from this spawning study is currently in preparation for submission to a peer reviewed journal.



Other Project Data


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Atomic force microscopy of bacterial surface membranes
Marine microbes rapidly turnover a high concentration of coral-spawn derived organic matter
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